The Sermon of the Wolf to the English

'I counted them all out, and I counted them all back in again.'

Silver-gilt livery badge of King Richard III’s noblemen, discovered at Fen Hole, Upton Parish, Market Bosworth, Leicestershire.
… where the boar furrowed black mould, his snout intimate with worms and leaves. 
Geoffrey Hill, Mercian Hymns, XI.
 … “Giue me my batell axe to my hand,
 sett the crowne of England on my head so hye!
 ffor by him that shope both sea and Land,
 Kingof England this day I will dye!
 one ffoote will I neuer fflee
 whilest the breath is my breast within,”
 as he said, soe did it bee;
 if hee lost his liffe, if he were king,
 about his standard can thé light,
 the crowne of gold thé hewed him ffroe,
 with dilful dints his death thé dight.
Ballad of Bosworth Field, stanzas 149-149.

Silver-gilt livery badge of King Richard III’s noblemen, discovered at Fen Hole, Upton Parish, Market Bosworth, Leicestershire.

… where the boar furrowed black mould, his snout intimate with worms and leaves.

Geoffrey Hill, Mercian Hymns, XI.

 … “Giue me my batell axe to my hand,

 sett the crowne of England on my head so hye!

 ffor by him that shope both sea and Land,

 Kingof England this day I will dye!

 one ffoote will I neuer fflee

 whilest the breath is my breast within,”

 as he said, soe did it bee;

 if hee lost his liffe, if he were king,

 about his standard can thé light,

 the crowne of gold thé hewed him ffroe,

 with dilful dints his death thé dight.

Ballad of Bosworth Field, stanzas 149-149.

King Richard did in his army in a marsh stand,
He was numbered to twenty thousand and three,
Of hardy men of hart and hand,
That under his banner there did be.
The Ballad of Bosworth Field, including additions from the prose summary B.L. Harleian, MS. 542, f. 34.
Picture of the treeline at Fen Hole, Fenn Lane Farm, west of Stoke Golding, south of Market Bosworth.
The roman road to Leicester bisects the fields The Fen and Fen Meadow to the north, then Fen Moor to the east.

King Richard did in his army in a marsh stand,

He was numbered to twenty thousand and three,

Of hardy men of hart and hand,

That under his banner there did be.

The Ballad of Bosworth Field, including additions from the prose summary B.L. Harleian, MS. 542, f. 34.

Picture of the treeline at Fen Hole, Fenn Lane Farm, west of Stoke Golding, south of Market Bosworth.

The roman road to Leicester bisects the fields The Fen and Fen Meadow to the north, then Fen Moor to the east.

Mary Tudor, Queen of France and Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk were officially married at Greenwich, married May 13th 1515.
Sir William Brandon, Suffolk’s father, was the standard bearer of Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond and later King Henry VII, at the Battle of Bosworth Field.
After King Richard III unhorsed Henry Tudor’s bodyguard Sir John Cheyne, Brandon was himself cut down by King Richard III, along with another of his sons.
  amongst all other Knights, remember  which were hardy, & therto wight;  Sir william Brandon was one of those,  King Heneryes Standard he kept on height,  & vanted itt with manhood & might  vntill with dints hee was dr(i)uen downe,  & dyed like an ancyent Knight,  with HENERY of England that ware the crowne.
Bosworth Ffeilde, 16th century, Anonymous Author, Stanzas 155 & 156.

Mary Tudor, Queen of France and Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk were officially married at Greenwich, married May 13th 1515.

Sir William Brandon, Suffolk’s father, was the standard bearer of Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond and later King Henry VII, at the Battle of Bosworth Field.

After King Richard III unhorsed Henry Tudor’s bodyguard Sir John Cheyne, Brandon was himself cut down by King Richard III, along with another of his sons.

  amongst all other Knights, remember
  which were hardy, & therto wight;
  Sir william Brandon was one of those,
  King Heneryes Standard he kept on height,

  & vanted itt with manhood & might
  vntill with dints hee was dr(i)uen downe,
  & dyed like an ancyent Knight,
  with HENERY of England that ware the crowne.

Bosworth Ffeilde, 16th century, Anonymous Author, Stanzas 155 & 156.

The Chiddingly Boar, silver-gilt livery badge of King Richard III’s noblemen, discovered Chiddingly, East Sussex 1999.
'Acting courageously, like a wild boar, supported by divine counsel and strengthened by divine help, when he had closed up the shield-wall, he moved his army without delay against the enemy.'
Battle of Ashdown, 871, from: Asser, Life of King Alfred, § 38.

The Chiddingly Boar, silver-gilt livery badge of King Richard III’s noblemen, discovered Chiddingly, East Sussex 1999.

'Acting courageously, like a wild boar, supported by divine counsel and strengthened by divine help, when he had closed up the shield-wall, he moved his army without delay against the enemy.'

Battle of Ashdown, 871, from: Asser, Life of King Alfred, § 38.

So God with man unites.
Needs must the Serpent and his capital bruise
Expect with mortal paine; say where and when
Thir fight, what stroke shall bruise the victors heel.
   To whom thus Michael. Dream not of thir fight,
As of a Duel, or the local wounds
Of head and heel: not therefore joynes the Son,
Manhood to God-head, with more strength to foil,
Thy enemie; nor so is overcome.
Satan, whose fall from Heav’n, a deadlier bruise,
Disabl’d not to give thy deaths wound:
Which hee, who comes thy Saviour, shall recure,
Not by destroying Satan, but his works
In thee and in thy Seed.
John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 12, 382-395.
vickzstar:

Spotted this on the new like cathedral next to the ruins of the old cathedral in Coventry. 

So God with man unites.

Needs must the Serpent and his capital bruise

Expect with mortal paine; say where and when

Thir fight, what stroke shall bruise the victors heel.

   To whom thus Michael. Dream not of thir fight,

As of a Duel, or the local wounds

Of head and heel: not therefore joynes the Son,

Manhood to God-head, with more strength to foil,

Thy enemie; nor so is overcome.

Satan, whose fall from Heav’n, a deadlier bruise,

Disabl’d not to give thy deaths wound:

Which hee, who comes thy Saviour, shall recure,

Not by destroying Satan, but his works

In thee and in thy Seed.

John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 12, 382-395.

vickzstar:

Spotted this on the new like cathedral next to the ruins of the old cathedral in Coventry. 

Objects divine
Must needs impaire and and wearie human sense:
Henceforth what is to com I will relate,
Thou therefore give due audience, and attend.
John Milton,Paradise Lost, Book 12, 9-12.
findlight:

John Piper, Baptistry Window (Coventry Cathedral).

Objects divine

Must needs impaire and and wearie human sense:

Henceforth what is to com I will relate,

Thou therefore give due audience, and attend.

John Milton,Paradise Lost, Book 12, 9-12.

findlight:

John Piper, Baptistry Window (Coventry Cathedral).

Thou hast seen one world begin and end;
And man as from a second stock proceed.
Much thou hast yet to see, but I perceave
Thy mortal sight to faile;
John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 12, 6-9.
hip365:

#365-70 Stained glass 
Remnants of stained glass in the ruins of Coventry’s bombed cathedral.

Thou hast seen one world begin and end;

And man as from a second stock proceed.

Much thou hast yet to see, but I perceave

Thy mortal sight to faile;

John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 12, 6-9.

hip365:

#365-70 Stained glass 

Remnants of stained glass in the ruins of Coventry’s bombed cathedral.

aesthetic-nocturne:

The Chi Rho monogram from the Book of Kells, named after the Abbey of Kells in Ireland.  By the way, I highly recommend the animated movie The Secret of Kells.  Watch it if you haven’t.  

aesthetic-nocturne:

The Chi Rho monogram from the Book of Kells, named after the Abbey of Kells in Ireland.  By the way, I highly recommend the animated movie The Secret of Kells.  Watch it if you haven’t.  

Swathed bodies in the long ditch; one eye upstaring. It is safe to presume, here, the king’s anger. He reigned forty years. Seasons touched and retouched the soil. /

Heathland, new-made watermeadow. Charlock, marsh-marigold. Crepitant oak forest where the boar furrowed black mould, his snout intimate with worms and leaves.

Geoffrey Hill, Mercian Hymns, XI.
Swathed bodies in the long ditch; one eye upstaring. It is safe to presume, here, the king’s anger. He reigned forty years. Seasons touched and retouched the soil. /
Heathland, new-made watermeadow. Charlock, marsh-marigold. Crepitant oak forest where the boar furrowed black mould, his snout intimate with worms and leaves.
Geoffrey Hill, Mercian Hymns, XI.